Antony & Cleopatra–Acts IV and V

I decided to do these acts together, because I predicted that both would involve at least one of the same thing: The deaths of Antony and Cleopatra.

 

Three things about their suicides:

  1. The idea that this is the only way to be the master of oneself. Antony’s lost everything and will have to submit his life, but if he kills himself, he submits only to himself–same goes for Cleo. What I think is interesting about this in lieu of the past references to being oneself and not being oneself in relation to the other lover–this seems the only way they rectify “oneselfness” again.
  2. The servant dies first. For Antony, he “learns” his option through Eros’ suicide (also, Eros is Antony’s servant? Antony begs his servant Eros to kill him? Eros…love, erotic love…WHAT’S SHAKESPEARE DOING WITH THESE NAMES…I CAN’T HANDLE HOW MUCH I LOVE THIS). Ahem. And Iras dies from…ehh…She just kind of, dies.
  3. Antony dies by the sword, Cleo by poison. Notice this is the opposite of what happens in Romeo and Juliet–And while that tale ends on the sound of woe, this one rings of pity.

One other note: there’s been a war in the last half of this play, and they only bodies we see are from suicides or people who have lost the will to live–non from the war.

Sorry this is late, I’m on a time crunch even as we speak. I’m seeking new employment with better more manageable hours–and one that doesn’t keep me there until one and leaving me so exhausted that I can’t wake up in time to post.

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Macbeth–Act V

So, as it turns out, I didn’t actually get the extra time to do a good entry like I had wanted, and since I’m working almost every day next week, I’ve got to get back on track, or I’m going to lose it! When you’re a bartender in Louisville on Derby week, you don’t have time for extra Shakespeare, I guess.

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One brief thing I noticed about Lady Macbeth. “You mar with all this starting” (V.i.45-46) struck me, particularly because once Macbeth started down this line, he’s fallen to the point that, “what’s been done cannot be undone” (V.i.69). And after Lady Macbeth’s suicide, or I’ve always assumed it was suicide, perhaps there is another dozen interpretations, Macbeth falls into despair. To Macbeth, her death is a result of the great chain of being that we are all a part of–we will all die–and it seems he doesn’t see, or chooses not to see, his role within her death.

Oo, now that we’re talking about death, a side note to point out lines that made me say aloud, “That’s so cool!” Macduff states, “Make our trumpets speak; give them all breath,/Those clamorous harbingers of blood and death” (9-10). The reason this strikes me as being so wicked awesome, lies in the image of breath. To give another one’s breath or blood, in any ancient understanding, signifies the giving of ones life. Breath=life. But here, it is a signifier of war, death, the end of life–but the giving of ones life too.

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Which brings me to my last point. Death. In this play, those that die are innocent, some are even the┬ádescendants of generations that will never live on. What Macbeth has done results in the destruction of the generation under him. He is truly a tyrant, in that sense. But, did not Caesar do the same? He completely destroyed the Republican consciousness of the Roman people by elevating himself to the point of king. There are a few allusions to Caesar in this play, made by Macbeth mostly, and I wonder what Shakespeare is saying about these two men and their tragedy. How they affect the generations after them, what types of men are they? Caesar did not listen to the oracles–Macbeth did. Who turns out the better?